Team Amirault's Taj II touring America & Canada Blog

In the top two photos, which were shoot from a distance of about a half mile, you can see the bridge structure as well as the greenery surrounding the water which has performed the ancient rock carving task. There are two bridges in this first photo – one on the right and a larger one on the left.

Natural bridges are formations created by water or even wind eroding the rock under the stronger upper layer of rock – they are created over long periods of times and eventually become smooth rock bridges between two separate land masses.

The Natural Bridges National Park is adjacent to the Navajo Nation Reservation – the largest native peoples nation within the USA. During our national parks tour, we have seen that many of our valuable landscapes and geological formations are in areas of the native Americans – over centuries these native people have been important protectors and preservers of these lands. We recognize their contribution and appreciate their role as heritage custodians.

This view above of another bridges shows the narrow tunnel that will be expanded over time by erosion. Below are two examples of tiny bridges in rocks above the large bridge. area – these created by rain and wind – the highly resistant rock withstands the forces of nature and becomes a bulwark against rock dissolution – thus creating a bridge however small.

The third photo is another large formation with a lush garden growing within – proof of the presence of water in this desert like environment.

This park – one of the smallest we stopped at – was a curious landscape where unique layers of stone and rock are affected differently and often weirdly, and offered us views highlighted by nature’s glorious architectural design.

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